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A Breakdown of the 2010 Census

A breakdown of the 2010 census in America

A Breakdown of the 2010 Census

The 2010 Census: A Lot More Than a Head Count

This year, America conducts its 23rd census. The nation’s largest domestic mobilization began in a remote corner of Alaska and will continue throughout the rest of the nation with the goal of counting each resident. But, the census does a lot more.

Assistance in Allocating Federal Funds

As of 2009, there were $400 billion in funds to allocate, and the census helps the federal government direct it. Direct payments make up 26 percent of that amount. Loans make up 21 percent of the allocation. Grants make up 21 percent. Contracts make up 17 percent of the amount. Insurance makes up 14 percent of the total. Everything else allocated is less than 1 percent of the total.

Measuring Compliance

The percentage of census mail-in returns as of April 14, 2010, varied widely by state. The top three states were Minnesota with 76 percent, Wisconsin with 75 percent and Nebraska with 73 percent of the forms returned. The bottom three states were Alaska with 57 percent, New Mexico with 58 percent and Louisiana with 59 percent of the forms returned.

The 2010 Census

This census used an integrated communications campaign to boost public awareness and participation. This campaign included paid advertising, census information in schools, a NASCAR race car, an interactive website, a road tour, partnerships and social media. The cost was $14.5 billion. This is a total cost of $47 per person.

There were 3.8 million people recruited for census operations. There were 28 different languages used in advertising throughout the U.S. There were 11.6 million pounds of paper used in the census forms, equal to 425 trucks full of paper. The maximum individual fine for not filling out a census form is $5,000.

The Cost of the U.S. Census Over Time

In 1790, there were six questions, conducted by U.S. Marshals at a cost of about $1 million. The U.S. population was about 2 million. In 1800, the census costs were little changed and the U.S. population was about 3 million. In 1810, the cost of the U.S. census was the same and the U.S. population had increased to about 10 million. Attempts to collect additional data on manufacturing that year were unsuccessful. In 1820, the cost of the census was still about $1 million and the U.S. population was about 14 million.

In 1830, the census cost was about $1 million and the U.S. population was about 20 million. In 1840, the cost of the U.S. census was about $1 million and the U.S. population was about 24 million. In 1850, the cost of the census was about $1 million and the U.S. population was about 26 million. In 1860, the final census with slave schedules was submitted. The census cost about $1 million and the U.S. population was about 30 million. In 1870, the U.S. population was about 46 million and the census cost was about $2 million. In 1880, professional enumerators replaced U.S. Marshals as census takers. The cost of the U.S. census that year was about $2 million and the U.S. population was about 50 million. In 1890, first-time enumerators were given detailed maps to follow. The U.S. population that year was about 65 million and the cost of the U.S. census was about $3 million.

In 1900, the content of the U.S. census was limited to questions dealing with population, mortality, agriculture and manufacturing. The U.S. population

that year was about 80 million and the cost of the census was about $3 million. In 1910, the U.S. population was about 95 million and the cost of the census was about $3 million. In 1920, the U.S. population was about 110 million and the cost of the census was about $3 million. That year was the first census in which the majority of the population lived in urban areas. In 1930, the U.S. population was about 130 million and the cost of the census was about $4 million. In 1940, the U.S. population was about 135 million and the cost of the U.S. census was about $4 million.

In 1950, the cost of the U.S. census was about $5 million and the population of the U.S. was about 160 million. That year was the first time that a computer was used to tabulate census results, using the first computer designed for civilian use. In 1960, the cost of the U.S. census was about $6 million and the U.S. population was about 190 million. In 1970, five questions were asked of all individuals. The U.S. population was about 210 million and the cost of the U.S. census was about $5 million. In 1980, the U.S. population was about 230 million and the cost of the census was about $15 million. In 1990, the population of the U.S. was about 250 million and the cost of the U.S. census was about $50 million. This was the first time that the census bureau defined census tracts and census blocks for the entire nation. In 2000, the U.S. population was about 280 million and the cost of the U.S. census was about $95 million. In 2010, the U.S. population was about 310 million and the cost of the U.S. census was about $280 million.